Brexit – The Probity of Government

Government White Paper admits no loss of Parliamentary Sovereignty

The Government White Paper for A50 confirms that the sovereignty of the British Parliament has always existed contrary to the agenda peddled in the Brexit Campaign. It is confirmation that Parliament and the Public have been deliberately deceived.

The Probity of the Referendum must be questioned and, with it the outcome.

There is strong evidence of criminal activity to usurp the sovereignty of Parliament by leading Brexiteers and by the current Government.

The lawfulness of the recent vote must be called into question as the vote was the product of fraud.

Brexit and Removal of Human Rights

 

MAGNA CARTA

Brexit breaches Magna Carta Clause 39:

http://www.salisburycathedral.org.uk/events/clause-39

“No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgment of his equals or by the law of the land.“ Our rights to EU Citizenship are protected by Clause 39 as well as other human rights acts in UK and EU Brexit Breaches Magna Carta Clause 39: “No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgment of his equals or by the law of the land.“

Our rights to EU Citizenship are protected by Clause 39. And Clause 39 underpins the infrastructure of English Law. As such, it would be difficult to repeal.

So is Brexit unlawful without repeal of Clause 39?

These rights to EU citizenship are also protected by UK EU and UN Human Rights Laws.

The Human Rights Act 1998 (the Act or the HRA) sets out the fundamental rights and freedoms that everyone in the UK is entitled to. In practice, the Act has three main effects: 1. It incorporates the rights set out in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into domestic British law.

The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (formally the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms) is an international treaty to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms in Europe. Drafted in 1950 by the then newly formed Council of Europe,[1] the convention entered into force on 3 September 1953. All Council of Europe member states are party to the Convention and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity.

The Convention established the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). Any person who feels his or her rights have been violated under the Convention by a state party can take a case to the Court. Judgments finding violations are binding on the States concerned and they are obliged to execute them. The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe monitors the execution of judgements, particularly to ensure payment of the amounts awarded by the Court to the applicants in compensation for the damage they have sustained. The compensations imposed under ECHR can be large; in 2014 Russia agreed to pay in excess of $2 billion in damages to former shareholders of Yukos.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) (text) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948 at the Palais de Chaillot, Paris. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of what many people believe to be the rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. The full text is available on the United Nations website.

The Declaration consists of thirty articles which, although not legally binding, have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, economic transfers, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions, and other laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966, the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights. In 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill has become an international law, to be followed by all.

 

General Election 2015 Fraud – Expenses.

If fraud is proven does this mean the Government is unlawful/illegal? It would mean that those (30)seats affected by the scandal are controversially held by Tory MPs and this would affect the outcome of the last General Election.

And if so, are laws and acts passed by this parliament unlawful? They must be if Electoral Fraud is proven.

This would include the Referendum Act, Brexit, the vote on A50, and also the sale of the NHS. All Government activity would be unlawful/illegal.

Moreover why is it taking so long to determine the presence or absence of fraud in such an important issue? Could this be symptomatic of a cover up?

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/29/whatever-happened-to-the-toryelectionfraud-investigation

If there is sufficient evidence for a criminal prosecution, there must be good reason to stop the Brexit Process, even by an injunction, until the probity and legality of this Conservative Government and its “victory” in 2015 is established.

There is a legitimate case for a Re-run of this “flawed” Referendum, which was used as a vehicle for a Tory Coup and replacement of David Cameron with an unelected Tory Leader, in view that Theresa May won the leadership by default.

 

Our parliamentary democracy has been threatened and sovereignty has been upheld by the courts.

This is truly shocking and MPs and the Tabloid Press are unrepentant.

Whilst the majority of MPs support the EU they have clearly been threatened and they recently voted with the government on A50 which gives Theresa May the Rights the Court denied her in the formulation of a personal Brexit Plan which should really be created by Parliament. The consequences of this democratic failure has enormous implications for our parliamentary democracy and the survival of the United Kingdom in particular.

It is certain that the democratic system will fail in the west unless we are able to enforce the accountability of politicians and those in Public Life through the Criminal Courts. Politicians lie cheat and deceive with impunity. Conflict of interests are the norm as is personal gain. Constituents are often treated with contempt. The Nation cannot survive this abuse which is shamefully tolerated. Conscientious whistleblowers are routinely threatened, silenced and end up in exile, leaving to work abroad.

 

I am one of them.

Ninian Peckitt

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon / Facial Plastic Surgeon

Source: Brexit – The Probity of Government | Ninian Peckitt | Pulse | LinkedIn

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